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Types of spousal support in California

| Feb 28, 2021 | Family Law |

Those who are facing a divorce may have concerns regarding their transition to single life. If a married couple each has drastically different income levels, one of them may qualify to receive spousal support.

Spousal support is a complex issue and the courts will consider several factors to determine if who is eligible. Additionally, there are many different types of spousal support in California. Most are temporary, but permanent alimony may be appropriate in certain situations.

Different types of spousal support

According to FindLaw, the following list includes different types of spousal support available in California:

         Temporary support is payment from one spouse to another, before finalization of an order

         Lump-sum alimony replaces traditional payments with a lump-sum which is meant to replace a property settlement

         Rehabilitative alimony includes regular payments to one spouse until he or she becomes self-supporting

         Reimbursement alimony pays for one spouse’s expenses, such as tuition, while he or she attempts to become self-supporting

         Permanent alimony continues until the paying spouse dies or the receiving spouse remarries

Factors courts consider during an alimony ruling

According to the California Courts website, a judge does not utilize a formula to determine eligibility for spousal support. Instead, the judge will consider several factors, some of which include the following:

         The length of the marriage

         What each spouse needs to maintain his or her current standard of living

         Monetary and non-monetary contributions of each spouse to the marriage

         Whether one spouse paid for the other’s education or career path

Additionally, the courts may determine that one spouse should receive alimony simply because it would be an undue hardship to seek employment while raising children.